Blog Archives

The Pretenders for the Weekend (Again)

 

A live version of a song from my favorite Pretenders album, Learning to Crawl.

The Pretenders for the Weekend

 

My favorite Pretenders song of all time.  ❤

Joe Walsh for Lent

I’ve already got a music post scheduled to go up later today, as I try to do on Fridays.  However, it’s still Lent, and Fridays, especially Fridays in Lent, are particularly appropriate for confession.  Thus, I thought I’d post this blast from the past in honor of the season.  For those of you who are Catholics, there’s still slightly more than a week to get to Confession before Easter!  Whether or not you’re Catholic, enjoy!

A Rare, Retro Team-up

A different take on “Wouldn’t It Be Good”, with Howard Jones as guest.

The Best of Depeche Mode, Volume 1 for the Weekend

Alan Parsons for the Weekend

Genesis Live, for No Particular Reason at All

My favorite song from Invisible Touch

Weekend Head-Banging: Powerslave by Iron Maiden

Simply Irresistible (or not?)

As a slight but necessary tangent to my series on free will and choice, which is itself a slight but necessary tangent to the issue of universalism, it’s necessary here to discuss the three basic views (there are subcategories, but these are the main ones to consider) regarding free will, or the lack thereof.

Libertarianism (not to be confused, in this context, with the odious political party or the even more odious political philosophy) is the belief that humans do indeed have free will.  Free will, in short, is real, not an illusion.  Just so we’re clear, we’re talking about the commonsense definition of “free will” as “the ability to do whatever you want, within the constraints of ability and duress”.  The last clause is important.  I am not free to flap my arms and fly to the moon, since that’s impossible.  The poor man is not free to eat at the Ritz, as the saying goes, since he lacks the money.  If I’m in jail or under the influence of drugs, my free choices may be prevented (I can’t just walk out of jail) or suppressed (I might do things under the influence that I normally wouldn’t).  Still, the basic definition–that I can do what I want, if I’m able to do so–is a good one for free will.

At the risk of stating the obvious, it is worth saying at this juncture that free will implies moral responsibility for one’s actions.  If I freely do something bad, I am responsible for that and worthy of blame, or even imprisonment or execution, if what I do is bad enough.  If I do something good through my own free will, I am worthy of praise and perhaps even honors and accolades.  This accords with the commonsense view of what free will is and what it entails.

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The Police Live: Invisible Sun

With guest vocals by Bono.