Category Archives: quotes

Quote for the Week

Every man alive in the world is a beggar of one sort or another, every last one of them, great and small. The priest begs God for grace, and the king begs something for something. Sometimes he begs the people for loyalty, sometimes he begs God to forgive him. No man in the world can have endured ten years without having begged God to forgive him.

–William Saroyan, “The Beggars” in The William Saroyan Reader (1958); courtesy of Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

I think that with all the emphasis on achievement, careers and competitiveness, science education has become — with notable bright spots to be sure — a joyless, alienating and frustrating experience for millions and millions of kids.  There are those science-fair-winner types and then there’s the rest of the class, not grooving on the material and hence, they find out, doomed to mediocre futures. Seems like ambivalence and hostility aren’t such surprising responses to such a message. … I think things might go better if the narrative of our scientific understandings of nature — what some are calling “Big History” — were told early and often, capturing the interest and imagination of students from a young age. They might then be eager to learn the problem-solving, evidence-based process of scientific inquiry that has led to these understandings.

–Ursula Goodenough, “It’s Time For A New Narrative; It’s Time For ‘Big History'”, in 13.7: Cosmos & Culture (10 February 2011); courtesy of Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

mainimage1

The religion of the Sufi is not separate from the religions of the world. People have fought in vain about the names and lives of their saviors, and have named their religions after the name of their savior, instead of uniting with each other in the truth that is taught. This truth can be traced in all religions, whether one community calls another pagan or infidel or heathen. Such persons claim that theirs is the only scripture, and their place of worship the only abode of God. Sufism is a name applied to a certain philosophy by those who do not accept the philosophy; hence it cannot really be described as a religion; it contains a religion but is not itself a religion. Sufism is a religion if one wishes to learn religion from it. But it is beyond religion, for it is the light, the sustenance of every soul, raising the mortal being to immortality.

–Inayat Khan, in The Spiritual Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan, Vol. I, The Way of Illumination, Section I – The Way of Illumination, Part III : The Sufi; courtesy of Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

Math background

Pure mathematics consists entirely of assertions to the effect that, if such and such a proposition is true of anything, then such and such another proposition is true of that thing. It is essential not to discuss whether the first proposition is really true, and not to mention what the anything is, of which it is supposed to be true. Both these points would belong to applied mathematics. We start, in pure mathematics, from certain rules of inference, by which we can infer that if one proposition is true, then so is some other proposition. These rules of inference constitute the major part of the principles of formal logic. We then take any hypothesis that seems amusing, and deduce its consequences. If our hypothesis is about anything, and not about some one or more particular things, then our deductions constitute mathematics. Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. People who have been puzzled by the beginnings of mathematics will, I hope, find comfort in this definition, and will probably agree that it is accurate.

–Bertrand Russell, Recent Work on the Principles of Mathematics, published in International Monthly, Vol. 4 (1901), courtesy of Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

giordano_bruno

If all things are in common among friends, the most precious is Wisdom. What can Juno give which thou canst not receive from Wisdom? What mayest thou admire in Venus which thou mayest not also contemplate in Wisdom? Her beauty is not small, for the lord of all things taketh delight in her. Her I have loved and diligently sought from my youth up.

–Giordano Bruno, courtesy of Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

martin-buber-61

The real struggle is not between East and West, or capitalism and communism, but between education and propaganda.

–Martin Buber, courtesy of Wikiquote.

Quote for the Week

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If a law commands me to sin I will break it; if it calls me to suffer, I will let it take its course unresistingly. The doctrine of blind obedience and unqualified submission to any human power, whether civil or ecclesiastical, is the doctrine of despotism, and ought to have no place among Republicans and Christians.

–Angelina Emily Grimké, Appeal to the Christian Women of the South (1836), p. 20.; courtesy Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

206

少无适俗韵,性本爱丘山。
误落尘网中,一去三十年。
羁鸟恋旧林,池鱼思故渊。
开荒南野际,守拙归田园。
方宅十余亩,草屋八九间。
榆柳荫后椋,桃李罗堂前。
暧暧远人村,依依墟里烟。
狗吠深巷中,鸡鸣桑树颠。
户庭无尘杂,虚室有余闲。
久在樊笼里,复得返自然。

  • When I was young, I was out of tune with the herd,

    Long I lived checked by the bars of a cage;
    Now I have turned again to Nature and Freedom.

    My only love was for the hills and mountains.
    Unwitting I fell into the Web of World’s dust,
    And was not free until my thirtieth year.
    The migrant bird longs for the old wood;
    The fish in the tank thinks of its native pool.
    I had rescued from wildness a patch of the Southern Moor
    And, still rustic, I returned to field and garden.
    My ground covers no more than ten acres;
    My thatched cottage has eight or nine rooms.
    Elms and willows cluster by the eaves;
    Peach trees and plum trees grow before the Hall.
    Hazy, hazy the distant hamlets of men;
    Steady the smoke that hangs over cottage roofs.
    A dog barks somewhere in the deep lanes,
    A cock crows at the top of the mulberry tree.
    At gate and courtyard—no murmur of the World’s dust;
    In the empty rooms—leisure and deep stillness.
    Long I lived checked by the bars of a cage;
    Now I have turned again to Nature and Freedom.

    • “Returning to the Fields”
    • Arthur Waley Translations from the Chinese (1941), p. 90; courtesy of Wikiquote

Quote for the Week

li-bai

花間一壺酒。
獨酌無相親。
舉杯邀明月。
對影成三人。
月既不解飲。
影徒隨我身。
暫伴月將影。
行樂須及春。
我歌月徘徊。
我舞影零亂。
醒時同交歡。
醉後各分散。
永結無情遊。
相期邈雲漢。

  • A cup of wine, under the flowering trees;
    I drink alone, for no friend is near.
    Raising my cup I beckon the bright moon,
    For he, with my shadow, will make three men.
    The moon, alas, is no drinker of wine;
    Listless, my shadow creeps about at my side.
    Yet with the moon as friend and the shadow as slave
    I must make merry before the Spring is spent.
    To the songs I sing the moon flickers her beams;
    In the dance I weave my shadow tangles and breaks.
    While we were sober, three shared the fun;
    Now we are drunk, each goes his way.
    May we long share our odd, inanimate feast,
    And meet at last on the Cloudy River of the sky.
  • “Drinking Alone by Moonlight” (月下獨酌), translated by Arthur Waley (1919). Courtesy of Wikiquote.

Quote for the Week

330px-Gilbert_du_Motier_Marquis_de_Lafayette

I read, I study, I examine, I listen, I reflect, and out of all of this I try to form an idea into which I put as much common sense as I can. I shall not speak much for fear of saying foolish things; I will risk still less for fear of doing them, for I am not disposed to abuse the confidence which they have deigned to show me. Such is the conduct which until now I have followed and will follow.

–Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, Letter to his father-in-law, the Duc d’Ayan (4 December 1776), as quoted in George Washington’s Generals and Opponents : Their Exploits and Leadership (1994) by George Athan Billias, p. 219; courtesy of Wikiquote.