Monthly Archives: August 2019

Two Hours of Classical Music from Cartoons

Quote for the Week

I believe this thought, of the possibility of death — if calmly realised, and steadily faced would be one of the best possible tests as to our going to any scene of amusement being right or wrong. If the thought of sudden death acquires, for you, a special horror when imagined as happening in a theatre, then be very sure the theatre is harmful for you, however harmless it may be for others; and that you are incurring a deadly peril in going. Be sure the safest rule is that we should not dare to live in any scene in which we dare not die.

But, once realise what the true object is in life — that it is not pleasure, not knowledge, not even fame itself, ‘that last infirmity of noble minds’ — but that it is the development of character, the rising to a higher, nobler, purer standard, the building-up of the perfect Man — and then, so long as we feel that this is going on, and will (we trust) go on for evermore, death has for us no terror; it is not a shadow, but a light; not an end, but a beginning!

–Lewis Carroll, Preface, Sylvie and Bruno; courtesy of Wikiquote.

Romantic Saxophone Music for the Weekend

Quote for the Week

“But what can I do?” cried she, spreading out her arms helplessly. “I can not hew down trees, as my father used; and in all this end of the king’s domain there is nothing else to be done. For there are so many shepherds that no more are needed, and so many tillers of the soil that no more can find employment. Ah, I have tried; hut no one wants a weak girl like me.”
“Why don’t you become a witch?” asked the man.
“Me!” gasped Mary-Marie, amazed. “A witch!”
“Why not?” he inquired, as if surprised.
“Well,” said the girl, laughing. “I’m not old enough. Witches, you know, are withered dried-up old hags.”
“Oh, not at all!” returned the stranger.
“And they sell their souls to Satan, in return for a knowledge of witchcraft,” continued Mary-Marie more seriously.
“Stuff and nonsense!” cried the stranger angrily.
“And all the enjoyment they get in life is riding broomsticks through the air on dark nights,” declared the girl.
“Well, well, well!” said the old man in an astonished tone. “One might think you knew all about witches, to hear you chatter. But your words prove you to be very ignorant of the subject. You may find good people and bad people in the world; and so, I suppose, you may find good witches and bad witches. But I must confess most of the witches I have known were very respectable, indeed, and famous for their kind actions.”
“Oh. I’d like to be that kind of witch!” said Mary-Marie, clasping her hands earnestly.

–L. Frank Baum, “The Witchcraft of Mary-Marie”, in Baum’s American Fairy Tales (1908); courtesy of Wikiquote.

Leon Russell and New Grass Revival for the Weekend

Quote for the Week

But how many merry monthes be in the yeere?
There are thirteen, I say;
The midsummer moone is the merryest of all,
Next to the merry month of May.

–“Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar”; courtesy of Wikiquote.

 

Some Music for the End of Summer

Various districts are starting school about this time.  Some are already in session, others start soon.  In that spirit, I’m designating this weekend as the End of the Summer (gotta pick one somewhere) and posting a two-hour mix of summer music.  Enjoy!

Quote for the Week

You man with a human body but a demon’s face,
Listen to me. Listen to the song of Milarepa!
Men say the human body is most precious, like a gem;
There is nothing that is precious about you.
You sinful man with a demon’s look,
Though you desire the pleasures of this life,
Because of your sins, you will never gain them.
But if you renounce desires within,
You will win the Great Accomplishment.

It is difficult to conquer oneself
While vanquishing the outer world;
Conquer now your own Self-mind.
To slay this deer will never please you,
But if you kill the Five Poisons within,
All your wishes will be fulfilled.

–Milarepa, “Song to the Hunter” as translated in The Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa: The Life-Story and Teaching of the Greatest Poet-Saint Ever to Appear in the History of Buddhism (1999) edited by Garma C. C. Chang; courtesy of Wikiquote

Miles Davis for the Weekend